STUFFED Turban Squash Shell

A great way to “dazzle” thanksgiving guests is by making a turban squash recipe. I like to stuff mine, because it just looks so beautiful when finished.

The recipe below has a few different components to it which makes it ideal for a family to make.  Each person can make a different part of the recipe and then add it all together at the end.  It is a little more complicated than some of the recipes we recommend, so is most suited for those who love to cook!

The Turban Squash is an heirloom winter squash (means its seeds originate from the originals).  It was first mentioned in a publication back in the early 1800’s in France.

The top of the squash is shaped like a “turban”, hence the name.  It comes in a variety of different colors and shapes and has a mild, nutty-like taste.

You can make so many recipes with this squash.  You can stuff it, serve in chunks, make a dip with it or puree to make a creamy soup.

The flesh is an “orange” color which means its high in Vitamin A. It also is an excellent source of Vitamin C and contains calcium and iron.

Stuffed Turban Squash Shell Recipe

Serves 6-8

Ingredients:

Turban Squash

  • 1 medium-sized turban squash
  • Organic Extra-Virgin Olive oil
  • Maple syrup
  • Cinnamon, whole and unrefined

Toasted Sourdough Bread Cubes

  • ½ cup homemade sourdough bread – I used the garlic sourdough bread from Great Harvest Bread Company in Denver, CO – such a hearty and pure tasting bread! https://www.facebook.com/greatharvestdenver/
  • Organic Extra-Virgin Olive oil
  • Granulated garlic
  • Coarse ground sea salt

Candied Pecans

  • 1 cup organic American native pecans
  • Maple syrup
  • Coarse ground sea salt

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

  • 1 cup Brussels sprouts
  • Organic Extra-Virgin Olive oil
  • Coarse ground sea salt                     

Cranberries sweetened with apple juice

Directions:

Turban Squash

  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  3. Carve out the turban part of the squash using a really sharp knife. Pop the top off and save it.
  4. Discard seeds and pulp from the top and bottom portions.
  5. Brush the flesh with olive oil. Place on baking pan, cut side down and bake for 50-60 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven and cool for at least ½ hour.
  7. Scoop out flesh onto a cutting board using a spoon. IMPORTANT: Be sure to keep the shell!
  8. Cut into “pseudo” bite size pieces. Squash will be a little mushy.
  9. Place in medium-sized bowl. Drizzle with maple syrup and sprinkle with cinnamon. Mix together.
  10. Set aside.

Toasted Sourdough Bread Cubes

  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  3. Cut sourdough bread into cubes.
  4. Place in a medium-sized bowl. Drizzle a line of olive oil around and just above the cubes (not on them).
  5. Sprinkle with granulated garlic and sea salt and mix together.
  6. Spread on baking sheet and bake for 7-10 minutes.
  7. Remove from oven and let cool. Set aside.

Candied Pecans

  1. Heat sauté pan on medium-high heat.
  2. Add pecans to pan.
  3. Lightly coat with maple syrup and sprinkle salt on it.
  4. Heat pecans until liquid is dissolved and pecans start to stick together.
  5. Remove from heat and let cool. Set aside.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  3. Rinse and then cut off ends of Brussels sprouts.
  4. Add to bowl and mix together with olive oil and sea salt.
  5. Place on a cookie sheet, cut side down.
  6. Put in oven and bake for 20-25 minutes. Check after 10 minutes if you have baby sprouts.

Assembly

  1. Add a big scoop of squash flesh to the shell.
  2. Top with a scoop of Brussels sprouts, candied pecans and a few cranberries.
  3. Continue this process until squash shell is overfilled.
  4. Dab in pieces of the sourdough cubes on top of the mixture. Serve warm.
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“Vegilicious” Soup

SOUP is the ultimate winter comfort food. Curling up with a bowl of hot soup and a slice of hot bread is like heaven on a cold day.  And it’s nutritious too!

When I make soup, I love to start with a base of veggie broth and then throw in whatever vegetables are in my refrigerator. It’s fun and you can discover some incredible flavor combinations you’ve never experienced before by making it this way.

Soup’s History: It’s hard to say exactly how soup came to be because it’s been around for so long, but I suspect it was most likely for economic reasons. When food was scarce, you could certainly stretch it a lot further by making a broth and then adding pieces of chopped up food vs. having an entire meal to yourself. Plus, it was more filling to eat it this way too.

I think this kind of sums up the value of it:

In one form or another, soup has been around since 20,000 B.C. and it’s easy to see why. A handful of ingredients on their own will only feed a handful of people, but if you were to cook them with herbs and spices in water, soup can feed a whole community. https://www.gloriousfoods.co.uk/inspiration/a-brief-history-of-soup

“Nutritalicous” Veggie Soup: The recipe below has all of the ingredients you need to make a healthy, nutritious meal.  It has vegetables, protein (beans) and grains (pasta).  You can even sub out whole grain pasta for the gluten-free kind.

And here’s what I love about it!

  • It’s naturally low in calories, fat and saturated fat.
  • It’s an excellent source of fiber!
  • It’s high in protein.
  • It’s also an excellent source of iron and potassium. Two nutrients that Americans can’t ever seem to get enough of.

Most of the protein in this recipe comes from the beans. If you’ve ever heard me speak, chances are I’ve talked about how beans are the most “perfect” food.  They are naturally low in calories, fat and saturated fat and extremely high in fiber! For example, the white beans in this recipe can have up to 19 grams of fiber in a cup and the kidney beans – 16 grams.  Even if you only ate ¼ cup of each of these types of beans in your meal, you would still consume around 9 grams of fiber – still an excellent source!  Beans are also a great source of protein, iron, magnesium, calcium, folate and B6. And not to mention all of the phytonutrients or antioxidants they contain. Very healthy stuff!

This recipe not only has a savory flavor, but also has an added sweetness from the tomatoes that sneaks up on you at the end. I even added an ugly carrot to enhance the sweetness.

Vegetable Soup

Paula’s “Vegilicious” Soup

Serves: 6

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion
  • 4-5 cloves of minced garlic
  • 5 cups of vegetable broth
  • 1 zucchini – diced
  • 1 cup frozen Italian green beans
  • 1 cup frozen corn
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 1 can (14.5 ounces) cannelloni (white kidney beans) – drained and rinsed
  • 1 can (14.5 ounces) red kidney beans – drained and rinsed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
  • 4 ounces cooked pasta – small shells (about 1 cup)
  • Sprinkle of salt
  • Sprinkle of pepper

Instructions

  • Heat oil in large sauce pan over med heat. Add onion and cook stirring occasional for 5 mins. Add garlic and cook 1 min.
  • Stir in broth, zucchini, corn, green beans and seasonings. Bring to boil and reduce to low, cover and simmer 10 mins until veggies are tender.
  • Stir in tomatoes with juice and drained beans. Simmer for 30 mins.
  • Add pasta to bowl and add soup on top with basil and seasonings and serve. I enjoyed this with a slice of avocado toast.  Ummm, ummm good!

A special thank you to Paula Schmelter Koszarek @wagthedogmedia for sharing this incredibly delicious vegetable soup recipe with us.

***If you have a recipe you would like to share with our teachers and students, please send it our way and if we can, we will highlight it, along with its nutritional value on one of our blog posts.